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Sculpture Culture

What is the Sculpture Culture of The United States?

Sculpture Culture....the way in which a society embraces Sculpture in public places, in their private residences, thru public funding of Sculptors, art centers and art education, the roll & purpose of sculpture in society as well as their perception of the Sculptor.

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Karen’s Mission: To Discover and Document the “Sculpture Culture” of The United States.

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Here are some questions Karen will be asking on the road trip to discover what the average american thinks about Sculpture, Sculptors and the Roll of Sculpture and Art in their lives.

• What is sculpture to you?
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• What first comes to mind when asked about sculpture? Classical? Figurative? Abstract?
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• What Sculptures or Sculptors do you know of off hand?... Michelangelo, Bernini, Xavier Messerschmidt, Rodin, Camille Claudel, Edgar Degas, Henry Moore, Fredrick Remington, Barbara Hepworth, Marino Marini, Isamu Noguchi, or Ron Mueck?
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• Would they or have they bought a sculpture for their home, garden or business?
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• Do they like public sculptures? Which ones are they familiar with in their area?
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• Do they know any working sculptors?
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• Have they ever taken a sculpting class or did any sculpting in school growing up?
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• Who is buying sculpture?
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• Can the average citizen afford a sculpture for their homes?
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• What would you tell your child if they wanted to be a sculptor when they grew up?
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• How much should a sculpture cost?
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• Have you ever been to a gallery? Or sculpture park?
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• What should sculptors earn in a year?

All these questions and more will hopefully be answered on this Ultimate Sculpting Road Trip. If you have questions you want Karen to ask email them to figurativesculptor@hotmail.com .

Michelangelo

Michelangelo


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Xavier Messerschmidt

Xavier Messerschmidt


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Rodin

Rodin


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Camille Claudel

Camille Claudel


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Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas


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Henry Moore

Henry Moore


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Fredrick Remington

Fredrick Remington


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Botero

Botero


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Barbara Hepworth

Barbara Hepworth


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Marino Marini

Marino Marini


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Isamu Noguchi

Isamu Noguchi


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Ron Mueck

Ron Mueck


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."Sculpture Culture" in Dublin Ireland
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A good example of a unique "Sculpture Culture" is in Dublin Ireland. The Irish really have a love and connection as well as a good sense of humor for their public works. They were very proud to introduce me to all their funny and beloved nicknames to all of their public sculptures around town, and there is a lot of sculpture in Dublin.
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The Spire is know as “The Stiletto in the Ghetto”, “The Nail in the Pale”, “The Pin in the Bin”, “The Stiffy at the Liffey”, and “The Rod to God”.

The Spire is know as “The Stiletto in the Ghetto”, “The Nail in the Pale”, “The Pin in the Bin”, “The Stiffy at the Liffey”, and “The Rod to God”.

“The Hags with Bags”

“The Hags with Bags”

Molly Malone sculpture is called…“The Tart with the Cart”, “The Dolly with the Trolly”, “The Trollop with the Scallop”, “The Dish with the Fish” or “The Flirt in the Skirt”.

Molly Malone sculpture is called…“The Tart with the Cart”, “The Dolly with the Trolly”, “The Trollop with the Scallop”, “The Dish with the Fish” or “The Flirt in the Skirt”.

Anna Livia Plurabelle sculpture is referred to as “The Floozy in the Jacuzzi”

Anna Livia Plurabelle sculpture is referred to as “The Floozy in the Jacuzzi”

The James Joyce statue is nicknamed “The Prick with the Stick”

The James Joyce statue is nicknamed “The Prick with the Stick”

Thomas Moore Sculpture shares space with a public toilet and has long been known as “The Meeting of the Waters”

Thomas Moore Sculpture shares space with a public toilet and has long been known as “The Meeting of the Waters”


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So I'm not asking or even wanting americans to go around nicknaming their public sculptures but I do want them to see this as a solid example of sculpture becoming intertwined with the everyday lives of the people who surround them. Either they love it our hate it or choose to ignore it, but if they acknowledge the sculpture as their own it becomes part of their cities cultural identity which strenghtens the community as a whole.

Posted by Karen Cope 08:14

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